Getting Connected: The Internet at 56K and Up

COMPUTER BOOK REVIEW  


COMPUTER BOOK REVIEW

387 words

Title: Getting Connected: The Internet at 56K and Up; 
by Kevin Dowd; O'Reilly & Associates Inc.; ISBN: 
1-56592-154-2; paperback, 410 pages, US$29.95 Can$42.95

Reviewer: Luis Henriques, "As a six month, self-taught 
ISP network administrator, I have personally benefited 
from this book. I discovered, in detail, how and why my 
computer network was designed." 

Connect to the Internet at 56Kbits/sec, or higher.

Are ready to save yourself precious time, money, not to 
mention the frustration encountered when attempting to 
configure complex network environments for attachment 
to the Internet? There has never been a book so complete 
and "simple" on the subject. 

Walk into the office of any network administrator, and you 
will see thick bible-like books containing information on 
network operating systems, router configuration, server 
application software, network security, network protocols 
and hardware installation (to name a few). Don't be surprised 
if you find this book at close reach.  

Kevin Dowd has written a book that probes into those detailed 
networking subjects and extracts the most useful and relevant 
information pertaining to the topic. This information is revealed 
to the reader in easy to comprehend terms. 

The structure is modular like, allowing reading from cover to 
cover or as reference material. Either way, it offers detailed 
step by step and by example solutions, granting this paperback 
an high rating in your computer book library.

The author takes the reader by the hand beginning with 
planning, and budgeting for a high speed Internet link. He 
makes us aware of time restrictions involved, teaches the 
tricks, and saves us much grief in the long run. The rich content 
ensures that the readerís expectations are met by opening 
our eyes to how the technology works and why our solution is 
unique and requires careful planning. 

Two important points must be noted: First; the book is not 
aimed at the user without first hand network management 
experience. The author assumes the reader lacks experience, 
but possesses an affinity for things technical. He also notes 
that experience in PC LANs or software development will 
lighten the load. 

Second; in the latter chapters aiding the setup of Internet 
services, the author tends to focus on UNIX based solutions, 
rather than Windows NT, Netware or other less configurable 
Internet networking OS's.

As a six month, self-taught ISP network administrator, I have 
personally benefited from this book. I discovered, in detail, 
how and why my computer network was designed. I 
appreciate the deep knowledge passed on to me in its 
clear concise manner. 

Ten books in one, to the point and useful information every 
Internet network administrator or connecting their computer 
LAN/WAN to the Internet, should have at their side. 

To the author a standing ovation. Bravo!


 


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